Monday, October 4, 2010

The wonders of our today were created from our yestersdays.

The Council:

You do not leave the material manifestation without leaving your mark whether it be good or bad, positive or negative, so that if you were to do something that would have repercussions twenty years from now and you were to pass away to the other side tomorrow, those would be your responsibilities. The following is a quote from The Council followed by a newsletter article by a member of SOL that demonstrates in real terms how this concept can and does occur.

The Council:  "You do not leave the material manifestation without leaving your mark whether it be good or bad, positive or negative, so that if you were to do something that would have repercussions twenty years from now and you were to pass away to the other side tomorrow, those would be your responsibilities."  
105th Trance - 06/19/1982

Let’s look at an example from more than 200 years ago that left a positive mark on the future.

It is late at night and a single candle is burning. A man is sitting at his desk writing something. His concentration is intense. He is not writing a letter as you might think. He is writing a musical score. This is not your average man. He is world famous, if your world is Europe and America. He is more famous than his contemporaries; Johann Sebastian Bach or Antonio Vivaldi. His name is Tomaso Albinoni and the year is 1745. What was the piece of music that Albinoni completed? Was it performed? No one knows, history has not recorded that information for us. This Italian composer wrote more than 50 operas (all lost) and hundreds of other pieces of music. Today, he is practically unknown except to those who truly love classical music. Actually, Albinoni is most well known for something that he had very little to with. But sometimes something very minute survives in a manner far beyond what we could ever imagine at the beginning.

Let us move ahead 200 years to another man. His name is Remo Giazotto. He was an Italian musicologist, mostly known for his systematic cataloging of the works of Tomaso Albinoni. He also wrote a biography of Albinoni. After World War 2 Giazotto was in Dresden searching the bombed out Dresden State Library. He was looking for achieves that might have survived the terrible bombing that the city received during the war. Almost everything was completely destroyed. However, Giazotto discovered a fragment of music in Albinoni's hand writing. Actually the library was known to have a large collection of original copies of his work, but not much had survived. The fragments contained a base and 6 bars of a melody, that is all. Based on those fragments of music that he discovered, Giazotto reconstructed the musical score. It is believed to have been the slow movement of a trio sonata. At first Giazotto simply showed people the work as if it were a composition of Albinoni. When the adagio was played it caused a tremendous stir in the musical world. Its fame grew at an astonishing rate. It was hailed as one of the finest pieces of music ever written. Soon it became obvious to Giazotto that the illusion had to be corrected. He announced to the world that the adagio was not a completed work by Tomaso Albinoni but a reconstruction from a very small portion of his composition. Normally this would have been the "death knell" for such a piece of music. However, because of the respect that the musical world had for Giazotto and because of the obvious beauty of this piece of music it has remained respected as one of the greatest pieces of classical music ever written.

What is the message in this story? It is this: no matter how insignificant our actions may seem, no matter how fruitless the effort appears on the surface, we never truly know what the future holds for those efforts. These few scraps of paper were hidden in a library for 200 years, undiscovered. Its residence was bombed into oblivion and yet it survived to be rediscovered by exactly the right person, at precisely the right time in history so that a masterpiece could be created for the enjoyment of all of mankind. Could some of our efforts produce something of significance for mankind’s future? Yes, they absolutely could!

For more about William LePar and The Council see - www.WilliamLePar.com

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